RANDOM SHIT

austevennar:

9404yowu:

weloveshortvideos:

I sound like Gru from “Despicable Me” when I have road rage? - Eh Bee

GRU

OMG THIS IS PERFECT

I'm going to college for animation and visual effects and It's my first time out in college, do you have any advise for me to get things organized or settled enough so I don't overwhelm myself with everything there is?

animatorlife:

WOOT WOOT!  Welcome to animation and the official club of all the cool geeky kids.  We’re a pretty awesome crowd.

Oh boy do I have advice - for both college and animation.  Hopefully you’ll find some of this useful.

The easiest way to break the ice in the dorms is with fresh cookies.

I am not joking with this one.  I baked cookies in the communal kitchen my first night and I went down the hall and introduced myself.  Obviously it’s a very extroverted thing to do, but everyone knew who I was and I was pretty universally liked.  So on those days when I was cramming for an exam or needed models for a photography project, everyone on the floor was willing to help me out.

Time management is your friend.

It’s super hard to learn but the quicker you figure out how to manage your time you’ll be so much happier.  Also make sure to schedule time for fun.  Sundays are always Carl days. (Carl is my husband.) No matter how much I have going on and what I am doing that is the day I keep open for us.  I also don’t work past 8:30 pm.  After that I do yoga, or read, watch a little GoT, or whatever else I feel like doing.  Relaxing is good for mental health.  

Take breaks.

I used to work all day and night non stop.  I was tired all the time and because I didn’t have time to cook I ended up eating a lot of junk which just usually makes stress worse.  Now I have myself trained that for every 2 hours I work I take 1 off.  Not for my job, obviously, but for my personal work or homework.  

Also, incentivising is a great idea too.  

My English professor said that he would drink a beer when he would write his papers and only then.  So if he felt like a beer he would force himself to get to work so that he had earned it.  I used to do it with coffee and cookies.  And when I was in college there was a group of us who would meet in the labs to work together with pizza and old movies.  

Get involved.

College is way better than high school in so many ways.  The main ones being freedom and diversity.  You’ve got more control over your schedule and there are so many more people who probably like the same things you do.  Go to those campus events at the Student Union and find clubs and groups to join.  You’ll meet so many cool people and you never know which of those people might end up being an industry connection some day.  You could even start a group.  When I lived in the dorms I would do an animation movie night once a month and we’d just chill and eat popcorn, but it was always fun.

Also, you’ll never realize how much you’ll miss college until you’ve graduated.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Now there will always be a couple of people you don’t like in any class, but there’s nothing wrong with admitting that you need help.  You can ask your teacher, a classmate, a friend who took the class before you, or even the campus tutor programs.  When you’re in your animation classes especially be sure to ask when you need it.  It takes a special kind of person to be an animator and 99 of 100 are pretty cool people.

Things can get super frustrating when you are struggling with something.  No one will think less of you for needing help, but they will think better of you for asking when you need it.

And if all else fails there, just shoot me an email and I will try to help.  :)

It’s okay to fail.

So, I was super nerd.  No joke.  Before I chose animation I was a math major with my eyes set on Ivy League.  I wanted to be a code breaker and be the person to discover the formula for predicting prime numbers.  I was a straight A student who was on the chess club, played clarinet in the band, and was the only underclassman on the Academic Challenge team.  Simply put, I did not fail.

I failed an animation class pretty hard.  Animation is challenging and I think that’s one of the main reasons I love it.  I had a breakdown when I failed my body mechanics class at AM.  I was quiet about it at first and didn’t say anything, but my husband knew something was wrong, so he bought me a pint of Ben and Jerry’s, bought me a dozen yellow roses, and popped in Beauty and the Beast and held my hand.  Then I broke down.

I know all of this sounds like a really pathetic thing to do, and it’s a little embarrassing to tell honestly, but I tell you because it happens to everyone.  We all fail at some point.  When I did I cried because there was never something I couldn’t accomplish with hard work until then.  It didn’t matter how hard I tried I wasn’t good enough, which then made me fear that I wasn’t going to make it.  I felt like I was letting you down.

I was very nervous about telling my parents in particular.  They knew I was struggling and always working on my animation; that I was doing my best.  When they asked me about my grade I choked up a little bit and told them how sorry I was.  This is what my dad said to me.

"Why are you sorry?  You gave it your all, and sometimes that isn’t good enough but you should take pride in the fact that you did your best.  You’re not a failure because you failed.  You’re a success because you keep trying and I am proud of you for it."

The very next day I scheduled my class to take it over again.  I got back on that horse and tried again.  And you know what?  I grew so much in retaking that class that I am happy that I failed.  I learned that I love animation enough to risk never making it, that everything was worth it.  I also met one of the greatest mentors and animators that I have ever had the pleasure of knowing.  Everything got better.

Every amazing animator that I know has failed at least one class.  There is always a concept that eludes us until it finally clicks and it always takes its sweet time while we wait for our brains to catch up.  It’s a rite of passage.  Just pick yourself up and keep going.

wannabeanimator:

More images from Inside Out

haletotheking:

OH NOOOOOOOO!

Oh my god

haletotheking:

OH NOOOOOOOO!

Oh my god

olgaulanova:

maxkirin:

+ DAILY WRITER POSITIVITY +

#115
If you ever doubt your story because you think people won’t like it, just remember that George Lucas thought Star Wars was too ‘wacky’ for the general public.

Want more writerly content? Follow maxkirin.tumblr.com!

or, “No one would watch an action adventure show with a female protagonist. Pfft.”

olgaulanova:

maxkirin:

+ DAILY WRITER POSITIVITY +

#115

If you ever doubt your story because you think people won’t like it, just remember that George Lucas thought Star Wars was too ‘wacky’ for the general public.

Want more writerly content? Follow maxkirin.tumblr.com!

or, “No one would watch an action adventure show with a female protagonist. Pfft.”

kingsleyyy:

this hedgehog is cheering for u bc u can do anything image

ask-ooc-jack:

atokniiro:

An introspective journey of artistic self discovery, presented as a 6 page comic.

I THOUGHT IT WAS DEEP

azmiscellany:

beauty and the beast 1989

"around this time of the year, 25 years ago, a small team of artists from california and europe started to work on their version of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. you can read more about the story behind the scenes in several of my earlier posts there was DON HAHN, the producer. ANDREAS DEJA and GLEN KEANE from animation, TOM SITO story, JEAN GILMORE visual development, DEREK GOGOL from london for production design, MICHAEL DUDOC DE WITT from london as well for storyboard, and me for storyboard, color and design, working in the animation studio of JILL and DICK PURDUM, in london. for a short time veterans MEL SHAW and WALT STANCHFIELD joined the team.”

From Hans Bacher’s Animation Treasures blog

neilsanders:

Over the past week I’ve been answering lots of messages about how to start out in learning animation. There’s a million easily accessible ways to start animating, but one of my favourite exercises is the 9 frame animated morph. Here’s a couple of examples freshly completed by my wonderful illustration students as a one lesson introduction to animation.

To start with everyone drew a simple image, then we arranged them in the best order to get silly transitions. I then photocopied each persons drawings so that everyone had their image and the image theirs was to morph into. We then traced off a breakdown pose and inbetweens which cushion to the first and last drawings to give them a nice ease in and out (see the above chart). We also used pegboards which I made myself to match the size of a standard 80mm hole punch to ensure that all of the drawings would line up with each other (it’s an illustration course and we only do a tiny amount of animation so there’s no justification for $700 hole punches).

Do any of you want one of these pegboards? I made a couple of hundred a few years ago but now I’m down to just enough for my classes, if there’s enough interest I could make another batch and sell them for a couple of bucks plus postage?

fishcustardandthecumberbeast:

spockhetti:

HAHAHAHAHAH SO MY FRIEND TOLD ME THAT SHE AND A FRIEND OF HERS ARE FAKING A RELATIONSHIP RIGHT NOW BECAUSE SHE WANTS TO TAKE HIM TO THIS HOUSE IN THE MOUNTAINS WHERE THEY HAVE YEARLY FAMILY REUNIONS BUT ONLY RELATIVES AND PARTNERS ARE ALLOWED

AND SHE’S LIKE YEAH SO WE ONLY HAVE TO ACT LIKE WE ARE A COUPLE BUT WE’RE NOT OF COURSE IT WILL BE FUN

HAHAHAHAHA M8 I HAVE READ ENOUGH FANFICTION TO KNOW WHERE THIS IS GOING

That last sentence.

This sounds like a re-enactment of Summer Wars

Let’s hope Love Machine doesn’t wreack havoc over the World Wide Web